Galleries: Rohingya Refugee Portraits, Bangladesh. 2009: rohingyasportraitsweb-8

Abdul Shukur, 23.Eye infection.Abdul's accident happened less than a month ago. While labouring in a paddy field not far from the camp, a grain of rice popped into his eye. The pain was overwhelming, but when he travelled to the hospital in Cox's Bazar he was turned away for being an unregistered refugee. He lost sight in the eye soon after, and can no longer open it without peeling back the lids with his fingers; he does so to reveal an eyeball almost entirely without colour and weeping with infection. He says he doesn't mind much - he can still technically work - but the partail blindness has made him unsteady on his feet, and last week he fell and broke his arm which means he can't return to the rice fields for several weeks. Asked if he feels strange returning to the job that lost him his eyesight, Abdul simply shrugs. {quote}There is nothing else,{quote} he says. {quote}I'm greatful for what I can get.{quote}

Abdul Shukur, 23. 

Eye infection. 

Abdul's accident happened less than a month ago. While labouring in a paddy field not far from the camp, a grain of rice popped into his eye. The pain was overwhelming, but when he travelled to the hospital in Cox's Bazar he was turned away for being an unregistered refugee. He lost sight in the eye soon after, and can no longer open it without peeling back the lids with his fingers; he does so to reveal an eyeball almost entirely without colour and weeping with infection. He says he doesn't mind much - he can still technically work - but the partail blindness has made him unsteady on his feet, and last week he fell and broke his arm which means he can't return to the rice fields for several weeks. Asked if he feels strange returning to the job that lost him his eyesight, Abdul simply shrugs. "There is nothing else," he says. "I'm greatful for what I can get."