Giles Duley
<b>Sab Meheras, 100.</b>While most Rohingya consider the question of their age with a moment's pause before seeming to pluck a figure from thin air, Sab smiles as tells us with some certainty that she reached 100 last year. She wears the century well, struggling to walk without aid, but sharp and articulate in her responses to our questions, and considering her situation with an insight bordering on the poetic.
Sab Meheras, 100.

While most Rohingya consider the question of their age with a moment's pause before seeming to pluck a figure from thin air, Sab smiles as tells us with some certainty that she reached 100 last year. She wears the century well, struggling to walk without aid, but sharp and articulate in her responses to our questions, and considering her situation with an insight bordering on the poetic. "I have seen many things in my life," she says, "times of war and suffering in my own country and across the world, but nothing has felt as terrible for me as the way my people were treated by the Burmese government." Does she think she'll live long enough to see peace for the Rohingya? "I think not. But I live in hope."

Giles Duley